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11 Jan

This T-Shirt Makes a Subtle Statement About Reproductive Rights, Just in Time For The Women’s March

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If you’re participating in the Women’s Marches next weekend, there’s a good chance you’re already thinking about your outfit—and there’s nothing wrong with that. Just a few days ago, the #TimesUp blackout on the Golden Globes red carpet proved just how impactful clothing can be. You might see women marching in head-to-toe black, though the color most associated with the Women’s March is hot pink, thanks in part to the pussy hat. But you can expect to see a lot of bold stripes in the crowds, too, namely Kule’s new 1973 T-shirts created in partnership with Prinkshop and the National Institute for Reproductive Health. The tees are available starting today, and 30 percent of proceeds will go to the NIRH to help protect reproductive freedom at the state and local level.

Why 1973? Roe v. Wade was passed in January of that year—almost 45 years ago exactly—legalizing abortion in the United States. While many people will immediately know why it’s stamped across your shirt, it will spark a conversation if they don’t. “Nineteen seventy-three already symbolizes something really powerful for a lot of people, but this is a way to get more people involved,” Andrea Miller, the president of the NIRH, tells Vogue. “We’re looking back to look forward, and seeing what we can learn from these important moments [in the past] that transformed our society and women’s experiences.”

Photo: Courtesy of Kule x Prinkshop
Photo: Courtesy of Kule x Prinkshop

For the retro 1973 graphic, Nikki Kule tapped Prinkshop’s Pamela Bell, who sells her own silk-screened tees with messages like “Eroticize Equality” and “You See a Girl, I See the Future” on her website. Her business skyrocketed in 2017 as women became increasingly vocal about the Trump administration. “For us, what better way to show that you care about something than wearing it on your chest?” she says. “When I first started my company, people kept telling me that no one wears graphic T-shirts and that they wouldn’t sell. Now, companies can’t even keep up with the demand for their graphic tees. It’s not just about a sale—it’s the fact that you’re wearing something that projects a message. It’s a different kind of status symbol.”

Of course, there are plenty of slogan-tee naysayers out there, and you’ve probably had a friend or relative tell you that fashion has nothing to do with politics. To that, Miller added: “Fashion is about making a statement and showing who you are, and in this moment, everything is political. Things that are very personal are also very political, and people care deeply about these issues and want to be able to express that. Right now, we’re seeing all of these attacks on women’s rights—women being denied affordable access to contraception, or being denied access to health care and insurance,” she continued. “And yet, we’ve also seen this tremendous upswing in engagement and activism. In some ways, we saw more positive momentum at the state level in 2017 than in previous years, as a counterweight to what’s happening in D.C. So this partnership gives everyone a way into that conversation.”

Thanks to last week’s revitalizing #TimesUp petition and the upcoming Women’s Marches, it’s fair to say engagement is about to be at an all-time high. Bell and her team will be traveling to Las Vegas for the march on January 21, and the NIRH will have a major presence, too. Wherever you are in the country (or the world!), show your support with the Kule x Prinkshop tees, available at kule.com and prinkshop.com now.

From Vogue

Hannah Kim
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